Friday, September 26, 2014

Quick Note/End of Dress-of-the-Day

Dearest Readers/Followers,

I had several more projects to share with you, but due to personal/health reasons, have not been able to complete them. Likewise, I am not sure I will be able to complete this series of Dress-Of-The-Day posts.

Do stay tuned however, for the drawing of the winner of the Mini-Sweepstakes/Giveaway for the Steampunk Apron/Bustle, which will still take place and be announces on October 1st! Remember that all you have to do to enter is comment on any post during the month of September (with a name/username that can be entered into the drawing... obviously 'anonymous' posts would not be viable entrants). And check back to see if you won/instructions on how to claim your prize.

Thank you all for following my blog this month. It's been a fun series to post!

HAPPY NATIONAL SEWING MONTH!

-Aimee (graverobbergirl)

Thursday, September 25, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 22: Anthropology Student's Dress (via On The Town)

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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THE ANTHROPOLOGY STUDENT'S DRESS
(via On The Town)
 
 
Yes, another day of coveting dresses I do not own. This particular dress I have drooled over for a very long time. Maybe that's because it's a shirt-dress, 40s-ish, and lined with plaid fabric. It's bold in color, full skirted and flirty fun.
 
You also have to love the matching tap pants for the dance number in the Museum of Natural History. And the coordinating handbag.
 
Apparently, other bloggers/seamstresses have beaten me to the punch with this dress. Morningstar84 made a reproduction of this dress for a commission, and then made-to-order in their etsy shop.  
 
But anyway, I shall discuss, if only for my own future reference.  
 
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FEATURES OF THE DRESS
 
  • Classic Shirt dress style, only with many more buttons than usual adding an extra layer of texture interest to the solid green dress.
  • Princess seamed, very fitted bodice.
  • Multiple, large gores for full swing-dance skirt.
  • Accented with black and white plaid (delicious!), including the skirt, which gives a flash of fun during the tap number.
  • Sweetheart neckline with ruffle plaid collar and black accent bow.
  • Short Sleeves with contrast cuff.
  • Matching green tap panties.
  • Matching, large handbag (because anthropology nerds can't cram all of their requisite supplies into a tiny clutch purse) 
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 21: Coveting the Quirky Card Dress

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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THE QUIRKY CARD DRESS
(ca. 1920s) 
 I'm not exactly sure how I stumbled across this dress on the internet, but I did, and immediately fell in love with. The original source is apparently no longer available, only pinterest pins remain, dating it as a 1920s vintage dress, which given its loose, drapey style may indeed be true.

The print however, is unlike anything I've seen before (bar quilter's cottons). I love the bright colors, the random motif, the water-color like quality of the design.

I might have to make a reproduction...

REPRODUCTION GUIDE:

  1. Identify the fabric. I'm thinking, because of the drape and the light hand, that this is very likely silk.  (Also the hand-painted look of the design makes this likely.) The other option I see for this dress is to digitally (or maybe watercolor, scan and clean up) design some fabric and have it printed through Spoonflower on one of their silks or silk blends.
  2. Break Down the Style. 
    1.  Locate the seamlines, and then the pieces involved in its construction.
    2. Sketch the garment and the pieces that comprise it. (The irregular hemline is simply a result of the asymmetrically cut bodice, which adds a little extra fun interest to the garment).
    3. Make notes of how you think the garment was constructed: gathers, darts, facings, hemmings, finishing stitches.
    4. Identify any special techniques and research them. In this case, I would start looking into hand-painting silk techniques, reading as many tutorials as possible.
  3.  Make list of required supplies. Most of the time, this would include fabric sources & notions (thread, buttons, zippers, etc.) sources. In the case of this dress,
    • plain silk fabric
    • painting supplies
    • thread
  4. After acquiring supplies and doing research, CRAFT TIME!
  5. Enjoy your new, unique, reproduction dress! I wish I had had the time to do this for the blog series, and maybe show you the progression of my reproduction crafting, but alas, I did not. But maybe someday...

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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).


Tuesday, September 23, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 20: The Walmart Dress

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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THE WALMART DRESS

Okay. So strictly speaking, discussing 'The Walmart Dress' seems to have nothing to do with Sewing... but economically-speaking, it's all related. So maybe stick with me and we'll get to the point.

  • The Walmart Dress is a simple design, made to have a variably fit, accommodating a range of body shapes and sizes. For example, this one is a stretchy knit, composed of six pieces in total, with elastic inserted in the empire waist.
  • The Walmart Dress follows current popular trends. This one is a maxi dress, a style seen everywhere this past summer.
  • The Walmart Dress is a mass-produced article of clothing, made at a cost that is far less than a person can acquire the materials to produce said item. In fact, it can be purchased by the consumer at a price many times less than it would cost them to make said item themselves. Why? Because of a globalized, greedy, consumer-based economy.
  • The Walmart Dress is a symbol of globalization, the death of artisanry, and the widening socio-economical gap between the wealthy and the poor in this country (The United States). The quality is poor, but the price cannot be beat. On the same note, other stores, carrying similarly mass-produced items, price their goods up to ten times higher. So what is someone with a tight budget going to do? And can you really blame them for wanting to stretch their hard-earned money just a little further?
  • The Walmart Dress makes consumers devalue goods, rendering them incapable of recognizing the importance of quality and supporting more local clothing producers, artists and craftspersons. The same can be said for most products available through such Coporate Chain Stores... but thankfully the 'Buy Local' movement is continually growing, spreading awareness of the availability of quality, locally produced goods and the support it renders to regional and small scale economies.

Oh. That was much more ranty than I had intended. And I really don't blame people for shopping at Walmart, especially when one's budget is tight. However, it's just something to keep in mind, that when you can, spend your money on the work of an artisan or a small, locally based company, support your own regional economy, because it is likely the one that supports you, your neighbor and family.

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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).


Monday, September 22, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 19: Linen Apron Dress

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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LINEN APRON DRESS
So... This a typical project for me, progression wise.
Making History Aprons (B5509)

First, I decide I would like to make something. In this case, a nice country/working sort of dress. In my head it's neutral tone, practical, made of some natural fiber, such as linen. Something I could wear on a homestead, in the garden, etc.

Second, I decide I want it to look vaguely old school apron-ish. And I know I have a pattern for historical aprons in my collection (Butterick 5509).

Next, this stews about in the back of my mind for a while, until one day I'm in the fabric store, and Linens are on sale. I peruse the linen fabrics, focusing on the neutral tones, because that is what makes sense for my project. But alas, this bright turquoise leaf-vine motif on white linen catches my eye. Guess what I buy?

Then when I pull the pattern and begin to make the very minor alterations (really just adding velcro in the back to close the bodice back up), I think about how I'm not really a fan of ankle-length dresses in the heat of summer, anyway. 

And I end up with something bright, with a busy pattern, and not at all what I intended. [[Also, empire waists make me look big (with my ginormo ribcage which causes my waist to disappear in the voluminous fabric that hangs down from my underbust). Guess there's a reason they say to put the waist of garments at your smallest part. But I still like this dress!]]

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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Sunday, September 21, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 18: Victorian Travelling Suit (via Judy Garland in Harvey Girls)

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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VICTORIAN TRAVELING SUIT 
(1940s Style)
Judy Garland in Traveling Suit

Original Costume at Auction
Despite encountering some rather harsh reviews of the film whilst researching this dress, The Harvey Girls is one of my favourite pointless and fun musicals. And (as probably is the case with many of my favourite movies) it might be due to the costuming.

In particular, I absolutely adore the Traveling Suit Judy Garland's character, Miss Susan Bradley, wears as she makes her way out west, and for the most well known number/song of the musical, On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe. It's done in late Victorian style, 1890s-ish, with a full gored skirt rather than the elaborate bustle style of the 1880s. It has a lovely asymmetrical bodice, small ruffle trim, and lovely scrollwork applique (at least, it looks to be applique).

The exact color is hard to pin down. It looks a little more lively than a straight grey, maybe with hints of periwinkle. In my copy of the film, it looks sort of like a lilac-grey.

The fit, of course is absolutely amazing on Judy Garland's figure (although, the story behind her being so very thin is quite tragic and she would've looked and sang just as well without all of the horrible pressure of the studios giving her eating disorders). Any tailored garment with such a level of detail looks amazing!


n
Actors on Break
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Historical Accuracy


Don't get me wrong, I absolutely adore the costuming in this movie, in particular this Traveling suit. But there's something just not quite period correct about it.

It's got the puff sleeves.

It's got the high collar and fitted bodice tapering to a point at the center front.

It's got the long skirt with train in the back.

It's got lovely trims and ruffle details.

Actual Victorian Suit
It's just....

The sleeves aren't leg-of-mutton, so much as 1940s puffy.

The collar isn't quite so high or constrictive.

The bodice fits nicely, but seems to have that inverted triangle 1940s silhouette.

The skirt is more just gathered in the back rather than the fullness lying over a bustle pad.

The details (applique) are more reminiscent of 1940s design work, specifically soutache detailing on blazers and the like.

A Stylish 1940s Suit
And then there's the silhouette... 

The Victorian corseted figure is very structured. The 1940s girdled figure is more ... fluid? It's hard to explain. 

Example: Victorian corsets flattened and pushed the breasts up. Forties fashion allowed for a slightly softer/more natural female shape.

The 1940s also had that inverted triangle shape, with wider, padded shoulders and slimmer hips, whereas the Victorian figure's goal was to be as curvy as possible, larger bosom, tiniest waist possible, wide hips and full bottom.


The differences are minor, but one can see the influence in the period costuming in films made in the 1940s, such as The Harvey Girls. It's easy to see these ladies are not doing their dance numbers and belting out showtunes as the top of their lungs in constrictive Victorian-style corsetry. And who can blame them for that? (Not to mention achieving the prized Victorian figure took years, starting at a very young age, of acclimating their bodies to an unnatural shape with corsetry. You can't just throw an a woman into a corset and expect her to look fully period correct. The culture that produced the ideal of womanhood no longer exists. The same can be said for modern women having 'thicker' waists than those in the 1950s. We haven't been wearing girdles since the age of 14, training our bodies to be hourglass shaped).
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Saturday, September 20, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 17: Retro Buttrick '53 (B5708), Busty Girl Problems & Fabric Find Tip

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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RETRO BUTTERICK '53 (B5708)

 Honestly, not a huge fan of this dress. I didn't think to adjust the fit while making it, and it turned out much too loose in the underbust and waist. Also, to get the shoulders to sit properly, I had to knot the ties so that the underarm seam is riding up too high. Perhaps, I should've just made a smaller size, instead of trying to accommodate my bust size. (But more on that later). It is a fun pattern, with variations on how to style the bodice by using the shoulder ties.

Butterick 5708


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BUSTY GIRL PROBLEMS:

When you make a size according to your bust measurement that ends up being too large everywhere else and it's not an easily adjustable style.

The only solution I see is to take in the lower bodice center front seam, and maybe part of the upper bodice-lower bodice front seam.

Unfortunately I already sewed the lining in, so this will be much more work. And I really should know better, that you have to make the effort to try it on in-progress. It was just tricky, because of not wanting to knot the shoulder ties before the bodice was finished, but it could've and should've been done.

Live ad Learn.
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FABRIC FIND TIP

Because I'm nice, I'll let you in on a secret, to the best, cheapest fabric you can buy nowadays (when you rarely see anything for under $5/yd). Jo-Ann fabrics has something called "Quilter's Showcase' line of fabrics. They are 100% cotton woven (calicos) fabric and come in extremely cute, vintage-y looking designs in an array of colors. Yes, they are a bit thinner than your Keepsake Calicos, Kona Cottons or other 'high quality' quilting fabrics, but they are also half the price even at full cost. Now the real tip... a couple times a year, the stores have a 50% off sale on these fabrics. Besides this rarity, I personally have not been able to buy a fabric for $2.50/yd for years, even from the 'red tag' or bargain bins. The hard part is stopping yourself from buying several bolts.
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Friday, September 19, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 16: Meghan's Unique Lagen Style Dress(es)

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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Meghan, of Cirque du Frock, is a very inspiring, strong, kind and creative individual with an ever-evolving style. She was my first blogging friend, and her posts always engaged me, because they were filled with not just her creative pieces, but her unique personality and soul. I'm always impressed by her vision and ability to take discarded items she thrifts and turn them into fun items of clothing that border on artwork. She can see past what already exists before our eyes to what an item could be. That's a unique gift.

And thus, I'm so grateful and excited to share with you the article she wrote up for my National Sewing Month series!
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GUEST BLOGGER: MEGHAN

Meghan in a cute OOTD Selfie

Hi! I'm Meghan and I blog over at www.cirquedufrock.com. Aimee asked me if I would pop over and do a guest post for her Dress-A-Day month in honor of National Sewing Month. Sewing is my passion and I wear dresses almost every day, so I jumped at the chance to write for her.

Lately I've become enchanted at the explosion of lagenlook and shabby chic clothing on Pinterest. Shabby chic reminds me of my childhood when my mother would drag me in and out of craft stores, and the only things I remember liking were usually in that French shabby style. My problem with loving these clothes is I don't love the 200$ (and up!) price tags that come with them. As a seamstress, and someone who loves thrift store shopping, those kinds of prices for dresses that look like floral tents make me cringe.

The Lagen Look

Taking inspiration from those styles, and trying to stay true to my punk-rock soul, I've started recycling tee shirts and vintage bed sheets into grungy baby-doll style dresses that look great with cowboy boots. I have a blast making them and they make me feel so pretty! Not to mention I have a large collection of tee shirts I was unwilling to part with just so I could look like a Magnolia Pearl model.


I do sell these tee shirt dresses, but mostly because I have so much fun making them. For me, the root of this style seems to be to feel both beautiful and comfortable, and I enjoy that creating this style allows me to continue to refashion clothes like I always have. I've been upcycling clothes since I was a teenager and I hold that past time close to my heart. With so much unwanted clothing in the world, and so many tricky stains on secondhand stuff, I like that this allows me to save things I wouldn't want to part with because of nostalgia.

Dresses, whether you make them or not, can become a part of your story. They represent a memory or a time or a date or a day or an occasion. That's what my dresses, as funny as they might look to some, mean so much to me. Because they all become a part of my story.

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You can find Meghan in the following interweb places (And yes, I apparently internet-stalk her a little.):

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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Thursday, September 18, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 15: The Fishtail Dress

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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THE FISHTAIL DRESS
 

Probably the most iconic dress in this style is that worn by Audrey Hepburn as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady. The film is purportedly set in 1912, and is definitely Edwardian in costuming style.

The Fishtail is defined by the extremely tight silhouette of the dress, molding to the hips and tapering with the legs until it flares in a fin-like fan/ruffle. Its origins are Victorian, rising to the height of fashion between the first bustle period in the 1870s and the second bustle period in the 1880s (history of bustle).

Satire about the Constrictive Victorian Fishtail Dress

The Gibson Girls are in part, if not wholly responsible for the Fishtail silhouette dress during the Edwardian period. This style also showed off the extremely curvy figure in fashion during the early 1900s, achieved through corsetry and padding.

Glamour Daze- The Real Gibson Girls

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TWENTIETH CENTURY

The Fishtail Dress was alive and well throughout the 20th century, with each decade placing its own variation on the style. But one thing remained constant, the sleek, sexy, curvy female figure.

Kay Francis, ca 1930s

Claudette Colbert, Cleopatra, 1934

Patricia Tuckwell, 1953

Marylin Monroe, 1950s











McCalls 3482 ca 1960s


1980s Fishtail Dress
1980s Lacy Short Fishtail

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How To...

The fishtail skirt is basically a fitted pencil skirt with some fabric gathered at the knee. But one does not even have to go through the trouble of drafting their own up, since it's almost always in style and thus patterns are readily available.

Burda 7089

For something with more Edwardian flavor...

Butterick 4954

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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 14: Tartan With A Twist (via Alexander McQueen & SJP)

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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TARTAN WITH A TWIST
 

I apparently missed out on this the first time around, when Sarah Jessica Parker wore this Alexander McQueen number to The Met Ball in 2006, receiving much criticism (but is now part of an art exhibit). I'm not sure why, besides that the fashion industry has ridiculous, wavering tastes that I don't care to ascribe to.

Anyway, I personally really enjoy this piece, the contrast between the bold tartan taffeta and the soft tulle,  the beaded applique and femininity of the ballerina dress and the stark black leather belt. But I admittedly have a thing for Tartan (what is modernly called 'plaid'). Technically, tartan refers to the print, and 'plaid' or 'plaide' actually refers to a specific piece/length of tartan fabric, and is closely associated with the original form of the kilt. (reference).

The woman's variation of the Great Kilt or 'Plaid' is the earasaid, which like early kilts, is a piece of clothing made from a length of Tartan folded, draped and fastened in a certain way. Undone, it is basically a blanket, and thus very utilitarian.

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How To...
  1. SEWING METHOD
    1. Find a Special Occasion Dress pattern with a full, tulle-filled skirt.
      Simplicity 3878
    2. Make Ballerina-Style dress.
    3. Acquire some Tartan/Plaid Taffeta
      Hancock Fabrics
    4. Drape Plaid in traditional method using  Kilts-N-Stuff's Earasaid Instructions OR Use a Traditional Scottish Dress Pattern
      OR
  2. NON-SEW METHOD 


    1. Acquire a Ballerina Tulle Dress
      Link
    2. Acquire some Tartan/Plaid Taffeta
      Fabric on Etsy
    3. Acquire a Belt.
    4. Simply Drape Tartan/Plaid Taffeta like an Earasaid: Kilts-N-Stuff's Earasaid Instructions
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Another Fun Tartan Folk-Inspired Dress
(Just because...)

Pattern on Burdastyle
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 13: Fun Under The Sun God

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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FUN UNDER THE SUN GOD DRESS


Fabric Available Here
I originally designed this fabric to enter a ModCloth contest, but naturally none of my designs were chosen. I am actually quite okay with this, since I have very mixed feelings about mass-produced items... ie I would never be a designer. Designers mainly conceptualize and rarely execute, just hand off ideas for other people to exercise the actual artisan skills, and then further down the line, mass production.

Anyway... I ended up rather liking the scarab beetle design (Egyptian art was one of my earliest aesthetic obsessions) and uploaded it to Spoonflower, ordering some myself to make a dress.  What is fun about this business/site isn't only that there are tens of thousands of unique designs (created by independent artists) available and that you can upload your own designs to be printed, but that they offer an ever changing variety of fabrics. I opted to try the cotton poplin for a nice, comfy summer dress.

I used Simplicity 2591, one of my favourite patterns, that is no longer in print, and apparently many people have found to be tricky/challenging. It isn't the most flattering style (being gathered and slightly loose in the stomach/waist) but is super comfortable, especially when made in lightweight cotton.

I accessorized this with my Pith Helmet, and a teal satin sash and bow. I wish I wore hats more... they are such fun. It's too bad that hats have gone from a standard/considered necessary daily clothing item (for many centuries going outside without your head covered was considered scandalous) to a rarity (how many hats, besides baseball caps, does one see in a day? More in the winter, for obvious reasons, but it used to be year-round staple). Anyway, I digress...

FEATURES OF SIMPLICITY 2591
  • Neckline and sleeve variations
  • Awesome pockets that are part of the dress' structure
  • Option front tab with button accent
  • Knee-Length
  • Fairly fitted bodice
  • Skirt front and back gathered to waist, for a looser/more comfortable fit
  
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Monday, September 15, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 12: Dust Bowl Dress

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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DUST BOWL DRESS
 

This was another dress born of the 1930s style inspiration. In my research, specifically Dust Bowl/Depression era rural women's clothing, I can across this interesting vintage dress with a front zipper, still in the prairie dress cut. This dress was sort of a hybrid of that style and a couple other similar ones.


Vintage Dress on Etsy
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FEATURES:
  • Bodice gathered to fitted midriff piece
  • Short Sleeves
  • Ruffle Neckline
  • Ruffle Hem
  • Ties in the back
  • Calico Retro Print. 
  • Zipper in Center Front

 












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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).

Friday, September 12, 2014

On Brief Hiatus

Heading North for the weekend, woo!

Dress-Of-The-Day will return on Monday, September 15th.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

DRESS-OF-THE-DAY 11: Knit Maxi Dress (My Summer Favourite)

In celebration of NATIONAL SEWING MONTH (here in the United States), I've decided to do an intensive blog series (well, intensive for me who obviously does not always make the time to blog), featuring a dress (or two, or a style) each day, not previously presented on this blog. Some will be my own creations, whether I used patterns or designed them myself. Others will be pieces I admire. Either will include an analysis and maybe some sources, history and tips. (At least, that's the goal.) I also have some guest bloggers scheduled (exciting!)

And now on to the Dress of the Day!
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 PINK STRIPE KNIT MAXI DRESS



So, I love my Pink Tie-Dye Dress SO much that I tend to wear it all the time in the summer, and thought, why not make another knit maxi dress in the same style. But of course, it's not quite as comfy as the organic cotton jersey, but I liked this bright pink and grey stripe knit that I saw at Jo-Ann fabrics (yes, that store is deadly to me).

Anyway, these dresses were made simply by laying a maxi dress I have onto the fabric and cutting around it, stick the ties at waist level and zip up the side seams, shoulder seams, finish the neck and armhole edges, hem. DRESS!

You could probably just lay down, have someone trace around you, measure a little to determine the neckline and armholes, and use that as a base for a stretch knit dress? I feel like buying any sort of pattern that does this is a waist, considering it's just two pieces...

Hair Toss, Just Because...
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And now that you've successfully navigated this blog entry, here's a reminder about the Steampunk Apron/Bustle Mini-Sweepstakes (details here).